Does Sudetenland exist? The border is distinguishable even 70 years after the expulsion of Germans

Does Sudetenland exist? The border is distinguishable even 70 years after the expulsion of Germans

Organisation: Czech Radio (Czech Republic)

Publication Date: 04/07/2017

Size of team/newsroom:small

Description

The expulsion of Germans from the Czechoslovak borderland following the second world war has completely changed the character of the country. The ruined towns and villages had to be repopulated with the Roma from the eastern Slovak and other ethnic minorities, as well as Czech people from the inland. While the newcomers had to adapt to a new communist order and forget their former homes, lifestyles and identities, they clearly did not. Seventy years later, the wave of new residents is still – perhaps surprisingly – reflected in the largest minority in the border area today, Slovaks. The statistics concerning unemployment, education quality, and voter turnouts are also showing the border of the historical area of Sudetenland, confirming the exceptional position of this area in the present Czech Republic.

What makes this project innovative? What was its impact?

The border area has been known for many negative social and economic trends: higher unemployment, more indebted families, lower education levels, lower voter turnout, etc. Connecting them directly to the post-war expulsion and repopulation effort opens a new – or, rather, a seventy years old – question of an identity.

Technologies used for this project:

Census data 2011, the historical language map, the historical political division map, qGIS.
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